2 Player

Fancy your self as part of a Dynamic Duo for these games, are you Batman or Robin?!

Showing 1–10 of 268 results

    “When you play the game of thrones, you win or you die. There is no middle ground.”

    Across the Seven Kingdoms, the Great Houses of Westeros struggle to control the Iron Throne. As the influential House Baratheon, honorable House Stark, treacherous House Lannister and fierce House Targraryen all vie in a life-or-death struggle for the future of the realm, dark and supernatural forces amass outside the kingdom’s defensive wall. Winter is coming. Do you have what it takes to emerge victorious in the only game that matters, A Game of Thrones?

    A Game of Thrones: The Card Game (AGoT:tCG) is an exercise in intrigue, diplomacy, and strategy for 2-4 players, and is playable in roughly 1-2 hours. The “Core Set” includes everything that up to four players need for a self-contained and vastly replayable gaming experience. Its most compelling attribute, however, is the infinite customization afforded by the LCG, or “Living Card Game,” system. This innovative new way of looking at card games gives players the ability to expand their library of cards, at a relatively small cost, by purchasing monthly “chapter packs,” which offer a fixed set of sixty new cards each. This setup allows you to choose which components to include, and it shifts the advantage away from players most able to afford rare cards (a common criticism of collectible card games) to where it should be: players capable of creatively compiling the most effective deck. In short, the LCG system levels the playing field, providing the best features of both CCGs and standalone card games.

    Whether you own only the Core Set, or you’ve collected every chapter pack available (or anywhere in between!), you’ll find AGoT: tCG to be a deep and satisfying contest of wits for yourself and up to three friends.

    Nabbarah: A city full of wonders and stories to be told ? a glimmering jewel in the middle of the desert.

    You are a thief, always on the lookout for the next target to hit. You decide to sneak into the Royal Palace, break in its treasure room, and look for the mythical treasures rumored to be hidden there. Among piles of gold, emeralds, and precious jewelry, you stumble upon a chest containing a mysterious hourglass. As soon as you touch it, you are filled with mystical energy and realize its true power: You are now able to see glimpses of your own future. By taking different courses of action, different paths unfold before you, allowing you to shape your future as you see fit. Unfortunately, everyone in the palace is now after you…

    A Thief’s Fortune is a card game for 1-4 players in which each player represents a different possible future of the same character. By visiting different locations, interacting with local characters and making sure that certain events you have seen actually happen, you try to find the path that will lead you as far away as possible from danger.

    In more detail, players each have three areas in front of them: past, present, and future. Over five rounds, players draft location, event, and character cards, adding them to their personal “future” area with resources on those cards. Players extract resources from those cards, and when they’re empty, the cards move into the player’s present, after which the player can activate the power on those cards to score the fortune points they need to win the game.

    Above and Below is a mashup of town-building and storytelling where you and up to three friends compete to build the best village above and below ground. In the game, you send your villagers to perform jobs like exploring the cave, harvesting resources, and constructing houses. Each villager has unique skills and abilities, and you must decide how to best use them. You have your own personal village board, and you slide the villagers on this board to various areas to indicate that they’ve been given jobs to do. Will you send Hanna along on the expedition to the cave? Or should she instead spend her time teaching important skills to one of the young villagers?

    A great cavern lies below the surface, ready for you to explore– this is where the storytelling comes in. When you send a group of villagers to explore the depths, one of your friends reads what happens to you from a book of paragraphs. You’ll be given a choice of how to react, and a lot will depend on which villagers you brought on the expedition, and who you’re willing to sacrifice to succeed. The book of paragraphs is packed with encounters of amazing adventure, randomly chosen each time you visit the cavern.

    At the end of the game, the player with the most well-developed village wins!

    Arboretum is a strategy card game for 2-4 players, aged 10 and up, that combines set collection, tile-laying and hand management while playing in about 25 minutes. Players try to have the most points at the end of the game by creating beautiful garden paths for their visitors.

    The deck has 80 cards in ten different colors, with each color featuring a different species of tree; each color has cards numbered 1 through 8, and the number of colors used depends on the number of players. Players start with a hand of seven cards. On each turn, a player draws two cards (from the deck or one or more of the discard piles), lays a card on the table as part of her arboretum, then discards a card to her personal discard pile.

    When the deck is exhausted, players compare the cards that remain in their hands to determine who can score each color. For each color, the player(s) with the highest value of cards in hand of that color scores for a path of trees in her arboretum that begins and ends with that color; a path is a orthogonally adjacent chain of cards with increasing values. For each card in a path that scores, the player earns one point; if the path consists solely of trees of the color being scored, the player scores two points per card. If a player doesn’t have the most value for a color, she scores zero points for a path that begins and ends with that color. Whoever has the most points wins.

    A tile laying game somewhat like Carcassonne / Fjorde where you are placing landscape tiles to gain points.

    Tiles are laid out in an alternating pattern, kind of like a chess board. Tiles alternate between building tiles on one diagonal and landscape tiles on the other. As soon as a building with your house is surrounded, you get 1 point if all the landscapes match, but you lose 1, 2, or 3 points if 1, 2, or 3 of the surrounding landscapes do not match. You can remove your house to reduce this loss, but at the end of the game, you get 1 point per house on your longest diagonal group of houses.

    The year is 1926, and it is the height of the Roaring Twenties. Flappers dance till dawn in smoke-filled speakeasies, drinking alcohol supplied by rum runners and the mob. It’s a celebration to end all celebrations in the aftermath of the War to End All Wars.

    Yet a dark shadow grows in the city of Arkham. Alien entities known as Ancient Ones lurk in the emptiness beyond space and time, writhing at the thresholds between worlds. Occult rituals must be stopped and alien creatures destroyed before the Ancient Ones make our world their ruined dominion.

    Only a handful of investigators stand against the Arkham Horror. Will they prevail?

    Arkham Horror (Third Edition) is a cooperative board game for one to six players who take on the roles of investigators trying to rid the world of eldritch beings known as Ancient Ones. Based on the works of H.P. Lovecraft, players will have to gather clues, defeat terrifying monsters, and find tools and allies if they are to stand any chance of defeating the creatures that dwell just beyond the veil of our reality.

    Something evil stirs in Arkham, and only you can stop it. Blurring the traditional lines between role-playing and card game experiences, Arkham Horror: The Card Game is a Living Card Game of Lovecraftian mystery, monsters, and madness!

    In the game, you and your friend (or up to three friends with two Core Sets) become characters within the quiet New England town of Arkham. You have your talents, sure, but you also have your flaws. Perhaps you’ve dabbled a little too much in the writings of the Necronomicon, and its words continue to haunt you. Perhaps you feel compelled to cover up any signs of otherworldly evils, hampering your own investigations in order to protect the quiet confidence of the greater population. Perhaps you’ll be scarred by your encounters with a ghoulish cult.

    No matter what compels you, no matter what haunts you, you’ll find both your strengths and weaknesses reflected in your custom deck of cards, and these cards will be your resources as you work with your friends to unravel the world’s most terrifying mysteries.

    Each of your adventures in Arkham Horror LCG carries you deeper into mystery. You’ll find cultists and foul rituals. You’ll find haunted houses and strange creatures. And you may find signs of the Ancient Ones straining against the barriers to our world…

    The basic mode of play in Arkham LCG is not the adventure, but the campaign. You might be scarred by your adventures, your sanity may be strained, and you may alter Arkham’s landscape, burning buildings to the ground. All your choices and actions have consequences that reach far beyond the immediate resolution of the scenario at hand—and your actions may earn you valuable experience with which you can better prepare yourself for the adventures that still lie before you.

    In Atari’s Centipede, 2 or 4 players venture into the world of the classic Atari arcade game. On one side, a Player controls the Gnome, exploring the forest and attempting to defeat the Centipede. On the other side, the Centipede Player, eager to destroy the Gnome, must wiggle their way to the other end of the board. The Gnome Player rolls and spends their dice to perform actions, while the Centipede Player uses a deck of cards to spawn Fleas, Spiders, and Mushrooms, trying to control the game board. The first Player to eliminate their opponent wins the game! Game co-designed by Jon Gilmour (Dead of Winter). Features 50 8-bit style wood pieces! An abstract strategy game based on the popular Atari arcade game!

    Introduced by the Moors, azulejos (originally white and blue ceramic tiles) were fully embraced by the Portuguese when their king Manuel I, on a visit to the Alhambra palace in Southern Spain, was mesmerized by the stunning beauty of the Moorish decorative tiles. The king, awestruck by the interior beauty of the Alhambra, immediately ordered that his own palace in Portugal be decorated with similar wall tiles. As a tile-laying artist, you have been challenged to embellish the walls of the Royal Palace of Evora.

    In the game Azul, players take turns drafting colored tiles from suppliers to their player board. Later in the round, players score points based on how they’ve placed their tiles to decorate the palace. Extra points are scored for specific patterns and completing sets; wasted supplies harm the player’s score. The player with the most points at the end of the game wins.

    Great Scott! Biff stole the DeLorean and went on a joyride through time, disrupting events and scattering items through space and time! Now it’s up to you to help Doc and Marty repair the space-time continuum before time paradoxes unravel the very fabric of the universe. Jump in your time machine, complete events, return items, and help! The future is in your hands!

    In this cooperative dice game, you’ll take control of a DeLorean and travel through the entire Back to the Future film trilogy, completing memorable events and returning key items to their proper place and time before the OUTATIME tracker reaches “Game Over.” Each round, you and your fellow players will roll dice to determine your actions, which include time travel, moving meddling members of the Tannen family, and more.

    You’ll use your dice to complete events form the films. Once an event is complete, you’ll draw an item card, which you’ll need to return by traveling to the year and location listed on the card. Then, the OUTATIME tracker is reduced—buying you more time—and you earn an Einstein token. Einstein tokens provide one action anyone can use later. In a pinch, you can even “ripple” dice by placing them on your space the board, allowing other players in future years to pick them up and use them!

    After everyone has taken their actions, advance the OUTATIME tracker depending on which year has the most unsolved events. Finally, add Paradox tokens to all unsolved events on the board. In later rounds, these will cause the OUTATIME tracker to go up even faster! Return all the items before the OUTATIME tracker reaches “Game Over” to win!